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American Indian Health Service of Chicago, Inc. will be the first choice for health service for the American Indian community and other under-served populations.

The California Indian Manpower Consortium, Inc. was formally created in 1978 under state law as a nonprofit corporation for the purpose of working for the social welfare, educational and economic advancement of its member tribes, groups, organizations and Indians and other Native Americans living in its service area.

The Membership of the Consortium includes federally recognized American Indian tribes, reservations, rancherias, bands, colonies, terminated rancherias, American Indian groups, entities, and organizations (public or private non-profit) satisfying the requirements set forth in the By-Laws of the California Indian Manpower Consortium, Inc. and as agreed to in the Consortium Agreement formally approved by the membership.

The primary purpose of the Consortium is to offer training, employment, and other activities designed to meet the employment and training needs of the client population. The principal funding source is the federal Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.

National Resources

The California Indian Manpower Consortium, Inc. was formally created in 1978 under state law as a nonprofit corporation for the purpose of working for the social welfare, educational and economic advancement of its member tribes, groups, organizations and Indians and other Native Americans living in its service area.

The Membership of the Consortium includes federally recognized American Indian tribes, reservations, rancherias, bands, colonies, terminated rancherias, American Indian groups, entities, and organizations (public or private non-profit) satisfying the requirements set forth in the By-Laws of the California Indian Manpower Consortium, Inc. and as agreed to in the Consortium Agreement formally approved by the membership.

The primary purpose of the Consortium is to offer training, employment, and other activities designed to meet the employment and training needs of the client population. The principal funding source is the federal Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.

Child Welfare

The California Indian Manpower Consortium, Inc. was formally created in 1978 under state law as a nonprofit corporation for the purpose of working for the social welfare, educational and economic advancement of its member tribes, groups, organizations and Indians and other Native Americans living in its service area.

The Membership of the Consortium includes federally recognized American Indian tribes, reservations, rancherias, bands, colonies, terminated rancherias, American Indian groups, entities, and organizations (public or private non-profit) satisfying the requirements set forth in the By-Laws of the California Indian Manpower Consortium, Inc. and as agreed to in the Consortium Agreement formally approved by the membership.

The primary purpose of the Consortium is to offer training, employment, and other activities designed to meet the employment and training needs of the client population. The principal funding source is the federal Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.

The Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) is a federal law that seeks to keep American Indian children with American Indian families. Congress passed ICWA in 1978 in response to the alarmingly high number of Indian children being removed from their homes by both public and private agencies. The intent of Congress under ICWA was to “protect the best interests of Indian children and to promote the stability and security of Indian tribes and families” (25 U.S.C. § 1902). ICWA sets federal requirements that apply to state child custody proceedings involving an Indian child who is a member of or eligible for membership in a federally recognized tribe.

ICWA is an integral policy framework on which tribal child welfare programs rely. It provides a structure and requirements for how public and private child welfare agencies and state courts view and conduct their work to serve tribal children and families. It also acknowledges and promotes the role that tribal governments play in supporting tribal families, both on and off tribal lands. However, as is the case with many laws, proper implementation of ICWA requires vigilance, resources, and advocacy.